4 Tips for Using Capacitive Sensors

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Where are Capacitive Sensors Used?

Image of SICK Capacitive SensorsCapacitive proximity sensors are non-contact solutions used to detect liquids, bulk materials and other non-metallic objects behind surfaces, including walls, storage containers, or covers.

Capacitive sensors are most commonly used for level and feed monitoring applications in food and beverage, automotive and warehouse environments. Their resistance to harsh environmental factors, such as dirt, make them reliable for a variety of applications.

In particular, capacitive proximity sensors are ideal for detecting the following:

  • Aggressive, contaminated media through plastic walls
  • Objects that absorb a high amount of light, such as wafers
  • Shiny or reflective objects, such as mirrors
  • Objects through packages

Get the most out of your capacitive sensors

With a variety of application factors to consider, how can you make sure you’re getting the most out of your capacitive sensor? Check out the 4 tips below:

Tip 1

Grounded and conductive targets provide maximum detection reliability and operating distances.

Tip 2

If the sensors sensitivity is adjusted too high — to the maximum setting — the sensor can lock on, meaning it does not switch off. Therefore, the sensitivity has to be reduced.

Tip 3

A capacitive sensor can detect objects through non-metallic walls. This is if the electrical permittivity of the object/medium behind the wall is higher than the electrical permittivity of the wall.

Tip 4

The detection is mainly influenced by the distance between the active zone of the sensor and the object/medium, the size of the active zone and the electrical permittivity of the object/medium.

SICK offers a range of capacitive proximity sensors with sensing ranges from 1 to 25 mm. View this video of SICK’s newest capacitive sensor, the CQ4.

For more information about SICK’s entire portfolio of capacitive proximity sensors, download this overview of Capacitive Proximity Sensors.

 


Jill Oertel

Jill is a Product Manager covering electromagnetic sensors and connectivity. She had enjoyed working for SICK as an Applications Engineer for the past four years. She lives in the Twin Cities and spends her free time with her husband, 2-year-old son and new baby girl (very busy)!

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